Book flight to

DUBLIN (DUB)

From 69€

Adults

16+ years at the time of travel

Teens

12-15 years at the time of travel

Children

2-11 years at the time of travel

Infants

Under 2 years at the time of travel

*You can only select a maximum of 9 passengers (Excluding Infants on Lap) per booking.

Cheap flights deal to Dublin

From To Flight type Departure date Fare  
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight
Bristol BRS Paris BVA One way Tue 22 Oct € 40.99 Book flight

A vibrant city with surprising experiences.

Located in Leinster Province, on the east coast of Ireland at the mouth of the River Liffey and embraced in the south by the Wicklow Mountains, Dublin is a small capital with a huge reputation. Since 2010, Dublin has been listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network as a global city with a ranking that places it among the top thirty cities in the world. It is a historical and contemporary centre for its education, art, administration, economy and industry. The Dublin heritage and hedonism tandem will not disappoint you.

What shouldn’t you miss out in Dublin?

Monuments
Obviously, when choosing a travel destination, we bullet point on the „to do” list the historical monuments and destinations of tourist importance. Dublin has something to amaze in this regard, with many landmarks and monuments dating back hundreds of years. One of the oldest is the Dublin Castle, and one of Dublin’s newest monuments is Spire, officially named the Monument of Light - a 121.2-foot conical stainless steel tower located on O’Connell Street. The Book of Kells, in the Trinity College Library, Dublin, is one of the most visited places in the city. This is an illustrated manuscript created by Irish monks around AD 800. The Ha’penny Bridge, an iron bridge over the River Liffey, is one of the most photographed attractions in Dublin and is considered to be one of the most iconic places in the city. Other landmarks and monuments include Mansion House, Anna Livia Monument, Molly Malone Statue, Christ Church Cathedral, Saint Francis Xavier Church in Upper Gardiner Street, near Mountjoy Square, The Custom House and Áras an Uachtaráin. Poolbeg Towers are also features of Dublin destination, visible from various places in the city.

Parks
Dublin also captures your heart with the green areas, many parks where you can ride a bicycle, as it is a „bike friendly” city, and enjoy nature, people, and good mood. The Dublin City Council manages over 1,500 hectares (3,700 hectares) of parks.

Shopping

Dublin centre is a popular shopping destination for both locals and tourists. The city has many shopping centres, especially around the Grafton and Henry streets.

Nightlife

At night, the city changes its face, becoming extremely vibrant, bright, cheerful. In fact, Dublin is one of the cities with the youngest population. 50% of the people are under 25. There are many pubs in the city centre, with the area around the streets St. Stephen’s Green and Grafton, especially Harcourt Street, Camden Street, Wexford Street and Leeson Street, the location of numerous nightclubs and pubs. The most famous nightlife area is Temple Bar, south of the River Liffey.

Music and cinema

In the streets of Dublin, but also in public places, you will often hear live music. The most popular cinemas in the city centre are Cinema Savoy and Cineworld Cinema, north of the Liffey. Alternative and of special interest films are found in the Irish Film Institute at Temple Bar and Light House Cinema in Smithfield. Modern multiscreen cinemas are located in suburban Dublin.

Climate in Dublin

If you go to Dublin, put in your suitcase an umbrella by all means, although the sheltered location of this city on the east coast makes it the driest place in Ireland, receiving only about half of the rainfall of the west coast. As for clothing, even in the summer, take with you a light jacket that you’ll have at your fingertips at any time; instead, in winter, do not wear too warm clothes. As the rest of Northwest Europe, Dublin is characterised by a sea climate with cool summers, mild winters and lack of extreme temperatures. The maximum average temperature in January is 8.8 ° C, while the average July maximum temperature is 20.2 ° C. On average, the sunniest months are May and June, while the wettest month is October, and the driest month is February. Precipitation is evenly distributed throughout the year.